Hyphen-Nation

Hyphen-Nation

In Hyphen-Nation the author writes about the common “enduring link” between Americans and their home lands. The authors uses President Kennedy as an example, and on page twelve states that his ascendance to presidency can be viewed as assimilation of Irish-American life. The author then goes on to point out different sources of ethnic revival. The first source can be found on page 19 and was the Civil Rights movement. The second, found on page 23, is antimodernism. The third source of ethnic revival is talked about on page 26. The author claims that this source of rival came from the many nationalistic feelings in the United States within its subcultures. With America being a “melting-pot” nation since basically its founding, it is easy to see how groups of people can have immense pride of their foreign origins when there are various different subcultures living with them as neighbors. It differentiates the subcultures and groups but doesn’t make anyone less American because no one is really truly an American. Later on page 31 the author states that new ethnicity was helped along by academics, and that we are schooled to look on matters of ethnic integrity, national composition, and American belonging. On page 32 he writes that in the 1940’s ethnicity stressed culture instead of race, and later goes on to compare race and ethnicity as “inseparable siblings” (32).  Towards the end the author describes ethnic heritage as “the living fiber that holds American together.” I believe this is an accurate portrayal of America since its the many different cultures that make up the nation.

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