History of the New Millennium

History of the New Millennium

In History of the New Millennium the author divides the text into four sections, named A Historical Controversy to End the Millennium, History in the Internet Era, History Beyond the Printed Page, and New Directions in Historical Scholarship. In the first section the author discusses methods of historical scholarship and their credibility regarding the truth of the past. An example that is used is the Holocaust. People deny the magnitude of the Holocaust, including some who deny it every happening, because of the “debate about the status of historical knowledge,” (167). Then, on page 169 the author talks about how misrepresentation of sources and/or plagiarism are issues that matter since research of scholarly value depends on the integrity of its practitioner. If they weren’t, the readers would have probable cause to not rely on what we know or are working on discovering, which will undermine history as a discipline and study. In section two,  History of the Internet Era, the author stresses that the most important development in historiography happened when people focused on new methods for communicating historical knowledge. The internet was one of these methods and greatly influenced the ways of research, teaching, and connecting historians with the public (171). Further in that section the author discusses how computers and the internet have changed over time and how they have altered almost all aspects of historians work. He/She also discusses the pros and cons of this. In section four, History Beyond the Printed Page, the author discusses non-textual forms of history representation. The author writes of Robert Rosenstone who argues that history on film needs to be evaluated in its own terms (176), and that film can communicate aspects of the past in ways which text can’t. Other examples of non-textual histories the author talks about are museums (Holocaust museum, Native American Museum, Hiroshima Air and Space exhibit), historical amusement parks (Colonial Williamsburg, Williamsburg VA), videogames, and comic art (Maus). In the last section, New Directions in Historical Scholarship, the author discusses global history as a challenging field that is more of a teaching field than a domain for original research due to is complexity (186). Then he/she talks about how global history is related to transnational history since it depends on the interaction of/ in another country.

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